On Dialogue

David Bohm was an American-born British quantum physicist who made contributions to the field of theoretical physics, philosophy and neuropsychology. He was also involved in a long-lasting dialogue with the Indian philosopher sage Krishnamurti.

In books such as "Thought as a System" and "Unfolding Meaning" he explores ideas about how thinking is not a neutral reporting of the world, but an active process that shapes our perceptions of and participation within the world. In "On Dialogue" he explores the implications of this for communication, and in particular the ways in which individuals, groups and societies tend towards self-deception, by not taking into account the way their own thoughts have formed their perceptions. The idea of 'dialogue groups' is proposed as a means of examining this process of (mis-)communication, and becoming more aware of the role played by our own thoughts and reactions to other peoples thoughts and actions.

David Bohm was engaged in a longterm dialogue with the Indian philosopher and sage Krishnamurti. They met in 1959 and continued their conversations on the activity and nature of human thought until Krishnamurti's death.

"One primary area K and DB enquired into is the nature of thought, (the essential definition of thought they worked with is the response of memory), how thought is limited, and the ways in which this creates fragmentation and division in ourselves and thus in the world we make. This fragmentation fundamentally influences the way we see the world, and is the source of the conflict we see everywhere... The source of the conflict...originates within each one of us because of the way we think, present tense, and how, when we stop thinking about something, it doesn't "disappear", but instead goes onto the memory and becomes thought (past tense)."

Genre
Non-Fiction
Topics
dialogue, memory, perception, quantum physics, sage, theoretical physics
Author
David Bohm
Format
Paperback
ISBN
0415336414 (find on Amazon)

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